Radiolab : npr

The show is nationally syndicated and is available as a podcast. Inlive shows were first offered. Hosted by Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwichthe show focuses on topics of a scientific and philosophical nature. The show attempts to approach broad, difficult topics such as "time" and "morality" in an accessible and light-hearted manner and with a distinctive audio production style.

Radiolab received a National Academies Communication Award "for their imaginative use of radio to make science accessible to broad audiences". Although Radiolab is a "limited run series", numerous seasons of five to ten episodes each have been produced. These themes were not necessarily science-related, but tackled issues such as the death penaltyreligious fundamentalism and politics in Africa and the Middle East.

They became fast friends and began collaborating on experimental radio pieces, the first of which they sent to Ira Glass for a proposed Flag Day episode of This American Life.

Not to be dissuaded, Abumrad and Krulwich continued to collaborate. By Radiolab had become an hour-long, science-themed program characterized by Abumrad's unique sound design style, and Robert Krulwich appeared as a "guest host" on a program about time in early June.

The change was noticeably marked by the omission of NPR's name in the show's opening audio sequence after the tagline, "You're listening to Radiolab Radiolab is aired on over radio stations across the U.

Each episode is one hour long and tackles various philosophical and scientific topics. Each Radiolab episode is elaborately stylized. For instance, thematic—and often dissonant and atonal—music accompanies much of the commentary.

In an April interview with The New York TimesAbumrad explained the choice in music: "I put a lot of jaggedy sounds, little plurps and things, strange staccato, percussive things.

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These recordings are often unedited and the interviewee's asides appear in the final product. In the same New York Times interview, Abumrad said, "You're trying to capture the rhythms and the movements, the messiness of the actual experience It sounds like life. As of June 15,the podcast offers full, hour-long episodes on a regular schedule with a variable number of podcasts in between "that follow some detour or left turn, explore music we love, take you to live events, and generally try to shake up your universe".

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Radiolab has been widely acclaimed among listeners and critics alike. Around 1. In a — study by Multimedia Research sponsored by the National Science Foundationit was determined that over 95 percent of listeners reported that the science-based material featured on Radiolab was accessible.

Radiolab has won several awards, including two Peabody Awards for broadcast excellence. On September 24,in a podcast titled "The Fact of the Matter", the program ran a segment about the yellow rain incidents in Laos and surrounding countries in the s.

Included in the story was an interview with Hmong veteran and refugee Eng Yang, with his niece Kao Kalia Yang serving as translator. After hearing the segment, Kao Kalia Yang and others complained that her uncle's viewpoints had been dismissed or edited out, that interviewer Robert Krulwich had treated them callously, and that the overall approach to the story had been racist. The complaints prompted several rounds of allegation, apology, rebuttal, and edits to the podcast, as well as commentary in various sources such as the public radio newspaper Current.

US art project by trolls. Through stories, interviews, and thought experimentseach hour-long episode usually deals with a specific topic and investigates it from several different angles. Sound design not a common practice in modern radio programmingrapid dialog edits and sound effects are used to build a soundscape constructing an expository conversation, and usually feature brief, seemingly unscripted tangents.

The episode credits are generally read by people who were interviewed or featured on the show, rather than by the hosts, while the program credits are read by listeners.

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Episode 3 of Season 12titled "Apocalyptical — Live from the Paramount in Seattle", was recorded at one of the live show tour locations that Radiolab performed. Unlike most shows, this show was recorded both visually and auditorily, and can be viewed on their official website.How do you actually make change in the world?

A few days ago, that flag came down. We dive into the story behind this de-flagging: a journey involving a clash of histories, designs, families, and even cheerleading. Kiese Laymon's memoir Heavy is here. Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it: How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.

Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. Back in Facebook began writing a document. Back then, the rules were simple, outlawing nudity and gore. How do you define hate speech? How much butt is too much butt? Facebook has answered these questions. Today, we explore that rulebook. We dive into its details and untangle its logic.

All the while wondering what does this mean for the future of free speech? In June ofBrandon Ogbunu got on stage and told a story for The Story Collider, a podcast and live storytelling show. Starting when he was a senior in college being shook down by a couple cops, Brandon tells us about navigating his ups and downs of a career in science, his startling connection to scientific racism, and his battle against biology's central dogma. You can find the full episode and learn more about The Story Collider here.

In this episode, we explore the origin of the reasonable officer standard, with the case that sent two Charlotte lawyers on a quest for true objectivity, and changed the face of policing in the US.

Then she discovered a performance by Nina on April 7, - three days after the assassination of Dr.

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Martin Luther King Jr. Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more. Reviews of the week's new movies, interviews with filmmakers, and discussion. News and culture through the lens of Southern California. Movies, music, TV, arts and entertainment, straight from Southern California. The Third. A TED Talk. Latest Jul. Latest Mar. The Customer Is Always Right.Radiolab, one of the most beloved podcasts in the world, reaches into its archives to create Radiolab for Kids.

It's a place where we've collected Radiolab's most family-friendly content. Because we all know that over the years, some of the content has been NOT so family friendly! From "What do dogs see when they look at the rainbow? Radiolab for Kids is sure to delight and engage the most curious minds. Created in by Jad Abumrad, Radiolab has won Peabody Awards, a National Academies Communication Award "for their investigative use of radio to make science accessible to broad audiences," and in Abumrad received the MacArthur Genius grant.

The show has an archive of hundreds of episodes and has toured in sold out shows nationwide. Radiolab is available on iTunes and heard around the country on more than member stations. Check your local station for airtimes. It seemed like a small moment. But as he went back to visit her, month after month, what began as a simple act of motherhood became a heroic feat that has never been equaled by any known species on Earth.

This episode was reported and produced by Annie McEwen. If you need more ocean in your life, check out the incredible Monterey Bay Aquarium live cams especially the jellies! Think Ben Stein in Ferris Bueller.

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For those of us who have trouble staying in tune when we sing, Deutsch has some exciting news. The problem might not be your ears, but your language. She tells us about tone languages, such as Mandarin and Vietnamese, which rely on pitch to convey the meaning of a word. Turns out speakers of tone languages are exponentially more inclined to have absolute AKA 'perfect' pitch.

And, nope, English isn't one of them. What is perfect pitch anyway? And who cares? Deutsch, along with Jad and Robert, will duke it out over the merits of perfect pitch.

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A sign of genius, a nuisance, or an evolutionary superpower? You decide. We can't. Do you want to hear Dr. Deutsch's musical illusions? Check them out here! As Joshua Foer explains, the Pitch Drop Experiment is so slow, you can watch it for hours check out the live cam and not detect the slightest movement. But that doesn't mean nothing's happening.

Professor John Mainstone tells us about his desperate attempts to catch the flashes of action hiding inside this decades-long experiment. Then, Carl Zimmer joins us for a little recalibration.A neuroscientist believes he has figured out what's going on in our brains that makes us feel this way. Likewise, early diaries by Catholic sisters revealed clues to the eventual fate of their brains.

Launched by Dr. David Snowdon, this is one of the most in-depth research projects focusing on dementia in the world. Magritte's painting The Intimate Newsp aper gets us thinking: Who is this?

A familiar friend or a complete stranger? Two different stories. But a shared delusion.

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A curious disorder known as Capgras delusion involves the distinct feeling that the people around you have been replaced. And no one is certain what causes it. The inch gold-plated records contain greetings in 59 languages, samples of music from different cultures and eras, and natural and human-made sounds from Earth. One record is currently And like any good mix tape — interstellar or not — it led to the man of her dreams.

If you give it too many jobs to do, it gets tired, calls it a day and gives into temptation. In one experiment, Ramachandran used a mirror and a cardboard box to perform the first "successful amputation of a phantom limb. But how does a doctor treat pain in an arm or a leg that no longer exists? And by age 4, children are getting the grasp of empathy. While the seeds of morality may be at least partially built into our genetic makeup, for children, developing a moral sense can still be a battle of impulses.

Take the case of the MIT team that made the icky-smelling bacteria E. But a few of us make a habit of it. Researchers have found evidence of structural differences in the brains of people with a history of persistent lying. Accessibility links Skip to main content Keyboard shortcuts for audio player.

NPR Shop. Radiolab Radiolab believes your ears are a portal to another world. Where sound illuminates ideas, and the boundaries blur between science, philosophy, and human experience. Big questions are investigated, tinkered with, and encouraged to grow.

Bring your curiosity, and we'll feed it with possibility.By submitting your information, you're agreeing to receive communications from New York Public Radio in accordance with our Terms of Use. NYPR Network. Radiolab with Jad Abumrad. Listen For Free Support Us. For years, Mississippi has had the Confederate battle flag on their state flag. Today, the dramatic behind-the-scenes story of it coming down.

Breastfeeding, beheadings and bombings, Facebook has rules to handle them all. Today, we explore those rules and ask what they tell us about the future of free speech. Today, an incident of racial profiling, a confrontation with scientific racism, and the liberation of RNA. How a diabetic, a cop, and a bottle of orange juice changed the way we police, forever. Nina Simone: what she told us then, and tells us now.

From a bio-safety lab to the woods of Tennessee, we explore the rhythms that shape our work, our lives, and our bodies. A mile under the ocean, we get to watch an octopus perform a heroic act of heart and determination. Pagination 1 2 Join our Mailing List.A two-time Peabody Award-winner, Radiolab is an investigation told through sounds and stories, and centered around one big idea.

radiolab : npr

In the Radiolab world, information sounds like music and science and culture collide. Hosted by Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich, the show is designed for listeners who demand skepticism, but appreciate wonder. Listen on Apple Podcasts. How do you actually make change in the world? A few days ago, that flag came down. We dive into the story behind this de-flagging: a journey involving a clash of histories, designs, families, and even cheerleading.

Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.

Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. Back in Facebook began writing a document. Back then, the rules were simple, outlawing nudity and gore. How do you define hate speech? How much butt is too much butt?

Facebook has answered these questions. Today, we explore that rulebook.

radiolab : npr

We dive into its details and untangle its logic. All the while wondering what does this mean for the future of free speech? In June ofBrandon Ogbunu got on stage and told a story for The Story Collider, a podcast and live storytelling show. Starting when he was a senior in college being shook down by a couple cops, Brandon tells us about navigating his ups and downs of a career in science, his startling connection to scientific racism, and his battle against biology's central dogma.

radiolab : npr

You can find the full episode and learn more about The Story Collider here. In this episode, we explore the origin of the reasonable officer standard, with the case that sent two Charlotte lawyers on a quest for true objectivity, and changed the face of policing in the US.

Then she discovered a performance by Nina on April 7, - three days after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This podcast stands out as pretty much constantly astounding. As someone who writes about science for a living, the 'scientific' concepts here are rendered in an enviably fascinating and pretty much idiot-proof way.

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It's a testament to the skills of the hosts in their use of the audio format that they can cruise through really complex stuff and give the ordinary listener entertainment and learning in a single scoop.

This is the best. Now if they would only get season one on itunes Listening to excellent episode on Mississippi state flag.Simon Adler takes us down a technological rabbit hole of strangely contorted faces and words made out of thin air. And a wonderland full of computer scientists, journalists, and digital detectives forces us to rethink even the things we see with our very own eyes.

Oh, and by the way, we decided to put the dark secrets we learned into action, and unleash this on the internet: Welcome to the future of fake news If you saw this on TV, or on your phone Using tiny audio clips, researchers from Adobe and Princeton turn text into the words of anyone they'd like. Using a generic video of President Obama speaking, researchers at the University of Washington can match his facial movements to a totally different set of words.

Researchers at Stanford have found a way to let ordinary people control the faces of presidents, in real time. Toggle navigation. Breaking News. Welcome to the future of fake news If you saw this on TV, or on your phone The technology of fake news. Project Voco Using tiny audio clips, researchers from Adobe and Princeton turn text into the words of anyone they'd like. Synthesizing Obama Using a generic video of President Obama speaking, researchers at the University of Washington can match his facial movements to a totally different set of words.

Face2Face Researchers at Stanford have found a way to let ordinary people control the faces of presidents, in real time.